Alzheimer research paper

A center for healthy living (CHL) is a new building typology that supports seniors through all eight dimensions of wellness. A CHL may be one program in a single building, or a collection of programs/services and spaces. This white paper explains the forces driving the development of CHLs and shares key findings from a comprehensive design research study conducted by our in-house team. The paper also looks to the future, exploring how CHLs might evolve. Several key concepts for the “CHL of Tomorrow” are described, along with four potential models for how these ideas may be expressed in future designs.

While "Centers for Healthy Living" was produced and edited under the guidance of the firm's Senior Living design leaders, the white paper and the research study findings on which it's largely based have particular relevance in related design fields including healthcare, hospitality, higher education, and mixed-use urban design. New and innovative care models for CHLs of the future will rely on design leadership across multiple sectors, resulting in communities that meet and exceed the needs of all people, not just seniors.

In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, Bredesen notes, there is not one drug that has been developed that stops or even slows the disease’s progression, and drugs have only had modest effects on symptoms. “In the past decade alone, hundreds of clinical trials have been conducted for Alzheimer’s at an aggregate cost of over a billion dollars, without success,” he said.

Your support makes it possible for the Alzheimer’s Research & Prevention Foundation to bring help, hope, and healing to millions of people whose lives are forever changed by Alzheimer’s.

This Disrupting Dementia tartan project was undertaken as part of Paul Rodgers’ Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Design Research Fellowship that aimed to explore how design can contribute to the design and development of a range of enhanced

Objectivity is very important in quantitative research. Consequently, researchers take great care to avoid their own presence, behaviour or attitude affecting the results (. by changing the situation being studied or causing participants to behave differently). They also critically examine their methods and conclusions for any possible bias.

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Very few activities stimulate only one sense or sense organ; few are beneficial in only a singular way. Furthermore, sensory stimulation for Alzheimer’s is not any different from beneficial sensory stimulation for any of us. A walk in the woods in the fall when the leaves are changing can be a magnificent visual experience. The variety and the vibrancy of the colors are the first things one notices, but autumn has its own array of smells and sounds. The pungent aroma of decay; the spicy smell of autumn flowers that can differ from the sweeter smell of spring blossoms; leaves crunching under foot; flocks of geese honking as they begin their migration south. Add to that the exercise and the fresh air and you have a comprehensive activity for one who has dementia as well as for the caregiver who accompanies him. I can’t think of a better way to provide sensory stimulation for Alzheimer’s.


alzheimer research paper

Alzheimer research paper

This Disrupting Dementia tartan project was undertaken as part of Paul Rodgers’ Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Design Research Fellowship that aimed to explore how design can contribute to the design and development of a range of enhanced

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